A Frivolous Post

BLOG TAKEOVER!!
Hello everyone, I am Moda-Lissa and I am honored to be taking over the blog today, but I must apologize in advance. I am not a word-smith like Carrie, but I do subscribe to Dictionary.com’s word of the day if that helps. I have tied Carrie up with Jelly Roll strips while I tell you a few things going on here in MODALAND. Even though Carrie is bound up, her brain never stops, right?
Aren’t you enjoying her wit and wisdom?
We sure are! (I don’t give up my office for just anyone! )
When Carrie came on board I felt strongly about giving her a few things to “make her own” and put her many talents to good use. One of those talents is evident in her musings on the Moda blog, the other talent I am going to talk about today is her eye for design. Did I say eye, I meant mind. She rattles off numbers, shapes and measurements like she was ordering a drink at Starbucks. “Then you will have a 2” by 6” piece left and if you cut carefully you can do this to the border or you can do this or you can do this or you can do that….Wow!!

Moda’s VP of design was interested in doing some more of our Moda Tin projects, so I thought this thought this was a perfect fit for Carrie. During one of her visits here we talked about this TIN project. I really wanted her to embrace it and
“make it her own”.
I challenged her to come up with a word. What would be the next Schnibbles? I asked.

RQC 483 Gertie pattern

Just look up the word Schnibbles in the Urban Dictionary ……

Don’t even think about leaving those schnibbles all over the floor, pick them up and throw them away! by Sweet Georgia Peach

If you type the word Schnibbles into any browser search, Miss Rosie Scnibbles is the only search result. Now Schnibbles is known for small bits of cloth and inspired a whole pattern line using the Moda charm squares.
Question: Which came first Schnibbles or Miss Rosie’s Schnibbles? I think a case can be made for both.

Frivols
Fast forward to FRIVOL
Friv-ol – 1865-1870; back formation from frivolous.
1. To behave frivolously, trifle.
2. Frolic.
We made it plural, Frivols so we could frolic more than once.
This is Carrie’s latest project.

Moda-frivol_1

 

Working with each of the designers to create a tin and a project that best shows their style. The Frivols 1 tin features Hello Darling from Bonnie & Camille and will be in stores mid August. I hear that lines will be forming outside of stores much like the launch of the Apple Watch. (that sounded like something Carrie would say so I threw it in there.)

 

 

Frivols – What are “frivols”?
1. They’re a series of collectible tins.
2. They’re a new Moda pre-cut only available in the tins.
3. They’re quilts.
4. All of the above.
There should be a fifth option – Frivols are about having fun. They’re what you get when you take Moda’s latest fabric collections, design original quilts using a new pre-cut, and then package the kits – and some extra little treasures – in a series of limited edition collectible tins.
Each month the tins will feature a different Moda design. We’re starting with Bonnie & Camille and continuing with Minick & Simpson, Brenda Riddle and Betsy Chutchian.

Moda-Frivols-1-4
The pre-cut. The first four tins will have 42 specifically chosen squares measuring 7” x 7”.  The quilts are not too big or too small, too easy or too complicated. Most are easily made in a couple of days. Some of the projects will require a few additional backgrounds, some of the projects  will just need binding and backing to be complete.
The tin. It’s big enough to fill with keepsakes, threads and ribbon, or a little sewing kit. Each tin is numbered 1-12.
It’s such a trifecta of perfection, you might need two… one to use and one to just look pretty on the shelf.
Let me just say that if you miss out on any of these tins I have a feeling they will be a much sought after item on EBAY. The Frivols tins are made in advance and have a limited run, unlike the million gillion collectible beanie babies out there.
I would say the majority of us have more fabric than we will use in our golden years but that does not stop us from collecting something fun and frivolous. Another bonus, the tins can be used to organize all kinds of goodies. Who doesn’t need a little help getting organized? That’s not frivolous at all!!
Carrie fits right in and has embraced “making it her own” by sharing her talent, creativity and generosity with all the moda readers as well as those of us that get to work with her everyday. It may sound frivolous but I am still the longest running president of her fan club!
Another thing I found on the Urban dictionary and is now my new nickname for Carrie.
You Schnibble-head!

So that is it for now. I am going to go untie Carrie and use that jelly roll for a quilt for market.

over and out,
Moda-lissa

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A nip here and a tuck there…

I’m getting a face-lift!

Well, not me personally, as in “not on my person”, my physical self.  Miss Rosie’s Quilt Co. is the beneficiary of this enhancement – the patterns.

I – we – need it.  And I’m pretty excited about it.

Cutting-Table---New-Patterns

Aren’t they pretty?

Okay, they’re not done.  That’s not even one of them.  Think of this as a sneak-peek into the operating room.

Wee Hours?  It’s a new pattern but that’s not it on the cover, that’s the Collection for a CauseFriendship quilt from a few years ago that was used for context and to help with the visual.  Full Circle?  That’s it on the cover – made with Alice’s Scrapbag, the beautiful new collection by Barbara Brackman.  Susan is working on the layout and diagram now.  She’s the perfect person to work with me as she used to teach third-graders.  The one in back is Viola… more on her soon.

I wrote a little while back that the biggest challenge has been working backwards – at least it’s backwards for me.

Back in the day – it does occasionally feel like forever-ago – I would see fabric I liked and let it noodle-around in my head until I got an idea for what to make.  Then I would think about different sizes of blocks, how big each would make the quilt, “about” how much fabric would I need and so on.  That part is still the same, the difference now is that I used to make the quilt before I wrote the pattern.  Now I calculate the yardage, write the pattern, make some chicken-scratch diagrams and then pass it along to the computer wizards.  Sounds good, right?

Cutting-Table---Otis

It is. But it isn’t without a hiccup on two.  This is Otis – more on “him” soon too.

The problem – problems? – arise when something doesn’t work as planned.  One of the new quilts had yardage calculated based on getting six squares per strip.  Cut to size, it would add up to 20 1/4″.  It was a very tight fit… maybe 1/4″ to spare.  But many of us – including me – would cut those squares a little bit larger to allow for trimming – they’re for half-triangle squares.  I cut them at 3 1/2″ instead of 3 3/8″ and while it adds up to 21″ and “should” still fit, it didn’t.  I could only get 5 squares per strip.  So that pattern will need a little work, a revision or four.

Where I have to get better is keeping the drafts and revisions on the computer updated or, more importantly, making sure that whomever is working on that pattern knows that it’s been updated.  Learning to work with other people is really hard!

As we find a format and style that works for the new patterns, some of the “old” patterns will be updated, re-colored and perhaps even re-made.  As we go through this process, I’d like to ask for your help on two fronts.

First, are there any “old” Miss Rosie’s patterns that you think should be on the list for a makeover?

And second, if you were making a list of what absolutely, positively should be in a pattern for it to be good, what would you include?  E.g., pressing, little tips, why I’m doing it the way I’m doing it, etc.

I’m off to cut some fabric so I can finish Viola.

Then I’m writing the pattern.  Pray for Susan.

 

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Marvelous Moda for Backgrounds

DSCN0154“Whit” pattern by Carrie Nelson of Miss Rosie’s Quilt Company; quilt pieced by Sherri McConnell of A Quilting Life

One of the first decisions to be made when planning a quilt is the choice of background fabric. Sometimes this is the hardest part of making a quilt: it’s easy to decide on favorite fabrics, but what type of background will really make them shine? Sometimes the choice is easy: solid white or a darker color might clearly work best. Sometimes two background choices have to be made as in the quilt above which features Moda Bella 9900-97 as the flying geese background with Moda Dottie as the secondary polka dot background.

2014-05-26 09.30.00And sometimes “low volume” or light prints included in a collection make the very best background choice of all. The two Schnibbles quilts above both use Moda fabrics by Minick and Simpson with the background selections for both quilts chosen from the lights in the various collections. There is also the option of combining solid background fabrics along with the lighter fabrics in a collection for even more variety.

 

DSCN0153“Tidbit” pattern by Miss Rosie’s Quilt Company pieced in Floral Gatherings fabrics

A variety of light prints from the Floral Gatherings collection was used for all of the backgrounds in the mini quilt above with the outer border pieced using the beige floral on cream.While use of these light prints for block backgrounds adds a lot of interest to this mini quilt, the prints are not overwhelming in these combinations and allow the block fabrics to stand out.

 

2014-08-18 16.00.27

“Nested Churn Dash” pattern by Jane Davidson pieced by Sherri McConnell of A Quilting Life

Sometimes the very best “low-volume” backgrounds come by using light prints from a variety of collections. The scrappy churn dash quilt above is king-sized and features fabrics from nearly every Minick & Simpson fabric collection. All of the lights and “nearly light” fabrics used for backgrounds also come from Minick & Simpson collections: every print is beautiful as it stands alone, and in combination, the variety of light background fabrics really adds an extra element of interest to the quilt.

When choosing fabrics for your next quilt remember to think about the variety of options for background fabrics. You just might want to pick up some extra yardage of your favorite light prints for the collection to use for part or all of your background!

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