All Small Bookazine from APQ

I wanted to tell you about a special issue that  is in stores and on newsstands now.
All Small
Wall Hangings, Table Runners, Baby Quilts & Other Little Treasures™
This publications is full of fun projects by Me & My Sister, Happy Zombie, Julie Cosmo,
Aneela Hoey, Piece o’ Cake, Buggy Barn, Open Gate, Joined at the Hip, Sherri Falls and many more.
A few of the projects from this publication, shown below.
STAIR STEP CRIB QUILT
Fabric Collection:
Ooh La La (pink colorway)
by Bunny Hill Designs
Designed by Carrie Nelson of Miss Rosie’s Quilt Co.
 TREAT TOTES
Fabric Collection: Ten Little Things by Jenn Ski and
(not pictured)
Pattern designed by Monica Soloria-Snow of Happy Zombie
 SEW SWEET PILLOWS
Pattern also designed by Aneela Hoey
Thank you to all the designers in this publication for sharing your creativity and designs with all of us.
Also be on the look for the following ads in some of your favorite magazine publications.
American Quilter May 2012

Quiltmania No. 88

quilts n more summer 2012

Quilter’s World May 2012

As always, Moda is only available in independent quilt and specialty stores. Ask for moda by name and help support the independent businesses.
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Get Paid Anywhere.

Our world of technology is forever evolving and doing business where ever you are is becoming easier everyday. It really does not matter the size of company you have when it comes down to getting paid. Everyone that sells something, whether it is a product or service, must have a way to receive payments.

 

In the “old” days of getting paid, you had to rely on cash or check.  Then banks started issuing credit and debit cards to easily access your money where ever you were.  And now… it’s all becoming virtual!

Check out two great gadgets we like for “Getting Paid” just about anywhere!
 

 Learn more about Square and the benefits it has for your company here… https://squareup.com/


 Learn more about PayPal HereTM and the benefits it has for your company here… https://www.paypal.com/webapps/mpp/credit-card-reader

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APQ Radio with Pat Sloan

Moda Fabrics was featured today on APQ radio with Pat Sloan. I had the opportunity to visit with Pat Sloan about the creation of the Moda Bake Shop, Slice Contest and Pat’s new fabric debuting at
Spring Quilt Market.
To listen to the show, click here.
March 19th, 4th segment
Pat Sloan
Angela Yosten was schelduled to be on the show but there are storms in her area so we will get to hear what she has to say at another time.
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Quilt & Sewing Temporary Tattoos

Express your passion for sewing & quilting with these fun new temporary tattoos!
These tattoos make for unique gifts & fun party favors! 
Quilters & sewers will enjoy sharing them with friends & sewing circles. 
They are also perfect for shop owners for giveaways at in-store events, shop-hops & quilt retreats. 
As you may remember, Fiber Flies also has these adorable car decals! 
More info on those here.
Ask for these fun tattoos & decals at your favorite local quilt shop. 
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Lucie Summers: Summersville

Wide, open skies, crisp Scandinavian interiors, and farm life all influence Lucie Summers. And they’ve provided the inspiration for her first line of Moda fabrics, the aptly named Summersville.

Those skies surround her at her home in Suffolk, England. “Where we live is very flat and not having mountains or hills means you get a different quality of light,” she says. “I appreciate the clarity of color.”

Though she’s not from Scandinavia, she loves its aesthetic, the simple white backgrounds and bright colors she sees in magazines. “I’m a homebody and have an obscene number of interiors magazines,” she says with a laugh. “But my home will never look like that because I’m not tidy enough. I bring too many things home from thrift shops.”

And finally, farm life: she share her days with her husband, whom she’s known since she was five. They and their two sons grow potatoes and onions on land that once belonged to her husband’s grandfather. “Living on a farm has a huge influence on my work,” says Lucie. “It’s things I see when I’m walking the dog: tracks left in the road by the tractor, corrugated iron, rust, growing things.”

Lucie’s also been influenced by her mother, with whom she owned a quilt shop (or patchwork shop, as the Brits say) for ten years. “People came looking for peach and green, but 80 percent of what we had was bright and modern,” she says. Lucie’s mom is a longarm quilter and they were the first shop in the United Kingdom to offer a quilting service online. Lucie’s mother still quilts—she did all the quilts Lucie brought to Quilt Market last October—but they closed up shop when Lucie had her sons, so that she could devote the free time she had to her design work.

Lucie’s designs have appeared on stationary and a book cover. She also screen prints fabrics, which she sells through her Etsy shop. And she continues to be an avid quilter, making at least one each year to enter in the Festival of Quilts show in Birmingham. She and her mother also collaborate on quilts. “I do the printing and piecing and she does the quilting and binding,” says Lucie. “She always miters the corners. My inclination is to chop them off. We complement one another, and she’s been a very patient, fantastic teacher.”

Lucie is thrilled to be working with Moda. “They’ve been brilliant, so open, and the colors are true to my originals,” she says. “It really looks like me and my fabric.”

What keeps Lucie designing? “I do my work because I’d curl up and die if I didn’t,” she says simply. “There are people who have to be creative, even if it’s just scribbling on a serviette, and I’m one of them. It’s an impulse, like breathing.” 

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